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Countries with the highest infection rates for Malaria and other parasitic diseases have some of the lowest death rates for COVID.


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:news:

Keep in mind these are some of the poorest countries with the worst medical systems.  I wonder what drugs are in high use in these countries for parasitic infections and Malaria?  

I don't care what anyone says this is worthy of honest review by the CDC/WHO or someone.

Oh and by the way they also have some of the lowest vaccination rates in the world.   Most of those countries below have vaccination rates of less than 5-10 per 100K. 

https://www.statista.com/statistics/1221298/covid-19-vaccination-rate-in-african-countries/

Love to see our local COVID experts explain all this away.   

Covid deaths per 100K

Uganda 6.88

Ghana 3.6

DRoC 1.22

Burkina Faso .84

Kenya 9.1

Zambia 20.25

Pakistan 12.11

Ethiopia 4.25

Malawi 11.86

Niger .85

How about the most modern western countries.

US 197.56

France 172.09

GB 199.83

Germany 111.1

 

Rank Country Reported Cases of Malaria (in millions)
1 Uganda 10.3
2 Ghana 8.8
3 Democratic Republic of Congo 6.3
4 Burkina Faso 6.1
5 Kenya 5.8
6 Zambia 4.7
7 Pakistan 4.3
8 Ethiopia 3.9
9 Malawi 3.7
10 Niger 3.5
Edited by Highmark
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I was at a dinner on Sunday and we were discussing something very similar.  Interesting to say the absolute least.  Shameful as hell to say more.

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6 minutes ago, Zambroski said:

I was at a dinner on Sunday and we were discussing something very similar.  Interesting to say the absolute least.  Shameful as hell to say more.

Statistics are pretty hard to ignore. 

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Wait this wouldn't have something to do with horse paste or horse dewormer would it.....    Pretty scary the lengths the one world order will go to push a narrative...

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1 minute ago, Highmark said:

Statistics are pretty hard to ignore. 

Apparently not as hard as feelings...

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Just now, JEFF said:

Apparently not as hard as feelings...

Or political ideology.  

Edited by Highmark
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2 minutes ago, poopooforme said:

Wait this wouldn't have something to do with horse paste or horse dewormer would it.....    Pretty scary the lengths the one world order will go to push a narrative...

The other FDA Approved drug that they black balled as soon as Trump started talking about it

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5 minutes ago, Skidooski said:

The other FDA Approved drug that they black balled as soon as Trump started talking about it

Africa also is present with a high amount of parasitic diseases that are treated with......you guessed it.... Ivermectin. 

https://parasitesandvectors.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13071-018-2655-5

Results

In total, an estimated 251 million people live in areas of LF and/or onchocerciasis transmission in SSA, based on 2015 population estimates. Of these, 96 million live in areas co-endemic for both LF and onchocerciasis, providing opportunities for integrated control programmes, and 83 million live in LF-monoendemic areas potentially targetable for the novel ivermectin-diethylcarbamazine-albendazole (IDA) triple therapy.

Edited by Highmark
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  • Highmark changed the title to Countries with the highest infection rates from Malaria have some of the lowest for COVID.

So we have poor countries with extremely low COVID vaccination rates, with terrible medical systems having the lowest death rates in the world from COVID who just so happen to also be in the highest use of Ivermectin and Hydroxychloroquine for other illness'.   Hmmmmm....

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  • Highmark changed the title to Countries with the highest infection rates for Malaria and other parasitic diseases have some of the lowest death rates for COVID.
28 minutes ago, Highmark said:

Africa also is present with a high amount of parasitic diseases that are treated with......you guessed it.... Ivermectin. 

https://parasitesandvectors.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13071-018-2655-5

Results

In total, an estimated 251 million people live in areas of LF and/or onchocerciasis transmission in SSA, based on 2015 population estimates. Of these, 96 million live in areas co-endemic for both LF and onchocerciasis, providing opportunities for integrated control programmes, and 83 million live in LF-monoendemic areas potentially targetable for the novel ivermectin-diethylcarbamazine-albendazole (IDA) triple therapy.

Yeah I should have said "And the other FDA Approved drug"   :bc: 

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Allow me to post for stupid Mc:

”Your all stupid and do your own homework and it’s only for farm animals and your all selfish people and your all low IQ people and DRUMPH and stuff!!!!!!!”

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Early on Fauci's NIH thought Africa would be devastated by COVID. 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7235494/

COVID‐19 is expected to hit drastically the African region

SSA countries are going through an epidemiological transition from largely communicable disease‐caused burden to an increasing predominance of the main chronic non‐communicable diseases: cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases, and diabetes. Data from China and Western Countries confirm that these comorbidities—along with others, such as age and obesity—are risk factors for developing a severe respiratory syndrome from SARS‐CoV‐2 (Zhou et al, 2020). Furthermore, the number of undernourished people in SSA rose from 181 million in 2010 to almost 222 million in 2016 while the percentage of overweight or obese adults increased from 28.4% in 2000 to 41.7% in 2016 (https://www.afro.who.int/sites/default/files/2019-08/AFR-RC69-7%20Strategic%20Plan%20to%20reduce%20the%20double%20burden%20of%20malnutrition.pdf). SARS‐CoV‐2 infection could therefore have a tremendous impact on African populations facing the double burden of malnutrition and obesity along with diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and respiratory diseases.

Furthermore, the affliction of communicable diseases in Africa remains very high and affects the most vulnerable and disadvantaged communities. In 2018, the African Region counted 25.7 million people living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and almost one‐third of new HIV cases worldwide (https://www.afro.who.int/health-topics/hivaids). In addition, 25% of global tuberculosis (TB) deaths occurred in Africa, where multidrug‐resistant TB is an emerging threat (https://www.afro.who.int/health-topics/tuberculosis-tb).

Compared with all other regions in the world, Africa fights against the greatest infectious disease burden with the weakest public health infrastructure, which is often concentrated at major urban settings leaving the countryside unserved. Most SSA countries suffer a chronic shortage of healthcare workers and hospitals and clinics are already operating at maximum capacity, leaving little margin for treatment and management of COVID‐19 patients. Moreover, many countries rely on external donor funding for specific health programs, such as against malaria, HIV, or TB, and such sources may become unreliable as the current health and economic crisis affects Western countries.

In many low‐ and middle‐income countries (LMICs), a Central Medical Store stocks and delivers necessary items to the lower administrative levels—regions and districts—without local storage points for stocking emergency supplies. Such a system may not be able to provide high‐quality products to all geographic locations during peak requests owing to stockouts, failure to properly forecast future demands, and delayed responses. Importantly, as Western countries aggressively acquire scarcely available test kits and protective equipment, Africa might face competition with first‐world countries to assure its own resources.

In a fight against a rapidly spreading disease, time is of the essence. Past experience from other communicable diseases in SSA has highlighted frequent delays between the acquisition and transportation of diagnostic samples to laboratories and the notification of test results back to health facilities which has a negative impact on treatment outcomes. A weak sample handling and referral system could represent another major barrier for establishing an efficient SARS‐CoV‐2 contact tracing network.

Given all these factors, the African region can be considered a high‐risk priority zone for proactive surveillance, detection, and containment of SARS‐CoV‐2, with central coordination of all interventions to reduce the burden on healthcare services

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